The Doors - Waiting for the Sun

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Posted on Thu, 10/02/2014 - 10:23am
by John MacMillan

Member since: Tue, 01/07/2014
 

Release Type

Studio Album

Release Year

1968

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Total votes: 1
 
 
 

Label

Elektra

 

Album Overview

Waiting for the Sun is the third studio album by the American rock band The Doors, recorded from February to May 1968 and released in July 1968. It became the band's first and only No. 1 album, spawning their second US number one single, "Hello, I Love You". It also became the band's first hit album in the UK, where it peaked at No. 16 on the chart.

    Tracks

    TrackTitleDuration
    1Hello, I Love You2:22
    2Love Street3:06
    3Not To Touch The Earth3:54
    4Summer's Almost Gone3:20
    5Wintertime Love1:52
    6The Unknown Soldier3:10
    Notes

    Bass: Kerry Magness

    7Spanish Caravan2:58
    Notes

    Acoustic Bass: Leroy Vinnegar

    8My Wild Love2:50
    9We Could Be So Good Together2:20
    10Yes, The River Knows2:35
    11Five To One4:22

    Background and recording

    With the exception of two songs, "Hello, I Love You" and "Summer's Almost Gone", which were recorded for the band's original 1965 demo, the material for Waiting for the Sun was written after the band's initial songs from the formation of the group had been recorded for their debut album and second album Strange Days.

    The centerpiece of this album was supposed to be the lengthy theatrical piece "Celebration of the Lizard", but in the end only the "Not to Touch the Earth" section was used. "Celebration of the Lizard" was intended to take up an entire album side, but the group was never able to capture a studio recording that they liked. (The band would revisit it later in its full-length form on their 1970 album Absolutely Live.)

    The title track "Waiting for the Sun" was left off this album, but would be included on the 1970 album Morrison Hotel.

    This album marked keyboardist Ray Manzarek's transition from a Vox Continental to Gibson G-101, the organ he is best known for playing live. The brighter sound of the Vox does appear on a few songs, most notably "We Could Be So Good Together."

    Guitarist Robby Krieger's skills with the flamenco guitar can be found present in "Spanish Caravan", with Granainas intro and a reworking of the melody from the classical piece Asturias (Leyenda) composed by Isaac Albéniz.

    Release

    Waiting for the Sun was released on July 3, 1968. The album has sold over 9 million copies.

    The US monophonic pressing, though only a fold down of the stereo mix to mono, is one of the rarest pop/rock LPs and has been sought after by collectors for years. Waiting for the Sun ended up being the shortest studio album by the band.

    A studio run-through of "Celebration of the Lizard" (subtitled "An Experiment/Work in Progress") and two early takes of "Not to Touch the Earth" were included as bonus tracks on the 40th anniversary expanded edition release of this album.

    Reception

    Waiting for the Sun has been generally well received by critics, though with most citing it as a step down in quality for the band's earlier records. Jim Miller of Rolling Stone wrote, "After a year and a half of Jim Morrison's posturing, one might logically hope for some sort of musical growth, and if the new record isn't really terrible, it isn't particularly exciting either."

    In his retrospective review, Richie Unterberger of AllMusic wrote, "The Doors' 1967 albums had raised expectations so high that their third effort was greeted as a major disappointment. With a few exceptions, the material was much mellower, and while this yielded some fine melodic ballad rock [...] there was no denying that the songwriting was not as impressive as it had been on the first two records." In his review of the 2007 reissue, Sal Cinquemani of Slant wrote "Despite the fact that Morrison was becoming a self-destructing mess, Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore were never more lucid -- perhaps to compensate. This was a band at its most dexterous, creative, and musically diverse …"

    On the cover of the album, Jim Morrison is seen wearing Glen Buxton's black sweater. Having been intoxicated the night before the shooting of the cover photo, the next morning Jim "started freaking out because the band wanted a picture of them at dawn, and he didn't have enough time to go home and get his clothes".

      Personnel

      • Jim Morrison – lead vocals, percussion
      • Ray Manzarek – Gibson G-101 and Vox Continental organs, RMI Electra piano, piano, backing vocals, percussion on "My Wild Love"
      • Robby Krieger – guitar, backing vocals, percussion on "My Wild Love"
      • John Densmore – drums, backing vocals and percussion on "My Wild Love"

      Additional musicians

      • Douglas Lubahn – bass guitar on tracks 1-5, 7, 9, 10, 11
      • Kerry Magness – bass guitar on track 6
      • Leroy Vinnegar – acoustic bass on track 7

      Credits

      Art Direction, Design: William S. Harvey
      Engineer: Bruce Botnick
      Photography By [Back Cover]: Guy Webster
      Photography By [Front Cover]: Paul Ferrara
      Producer: Paul A. Rothchild
      Written-By, Arranged By: The Doors
       

       

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      Attribution

      Waiting for the Sun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia : taken from - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_for_the_Sun
      https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/